• Schumann Symphonic Etudes No.3 Evenness and accent on the thumb

    Length: 8’05”

  • Prokofiev Sonata No. 7: Handling large intervals, distances and 5-finger scales
    • 0:00-2:27: How to avoid stretching in large intervals
    • 2:27-6:03: breaking intervals that are to big for your hand
    • 6:03-6:45: legato octaves
    • 6:45- 10:22: Staccato leaps in left hand
    • 10:20-11:32: Scale crossing from 5th to thumb
    • 11:32-12:20: when a 5-finger scale ends with an octave
  • Debussy La Puerta del Vino- Double Thirds
  • Chopin Etude Op.25 No.2 m.7 / 5th finger at the end of the arpeggio feels weak
  • Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4 Interdependence of the hands / broken chords
  • Beethoven 5th concerto 1st mov. M.187 Double Thirds
  • Edna answers questions at the August 6 Golandsky Institute Online Workshop
  • Golandsky Institute Online Workshop: Edna Golandsky answers questions
  • Q&A 11

    If you have questions concerning the Taubman Technique, you can now leave them in comments on this blog.

    Time may not allow me to answer all your questions but those selected to be answered will be taped every few weeks and shown here. I’m looking forward to hearing from you.

  • Chopin Op.10 No.12 m.7

    Length: 7’42”

    Fingering/ In and Out / Shaping

  • Scarlatti Toccata K.141 – M. 65-70 and M. 1-7

    0:00-7:54 M.65-70 : Fingering, In and out motions and when to connect and disconnect

    • 0:00- 3:30 fingering and rotation
    • 3:31-5:31 In and out motion
    • 5:32-6:40 Shaping
    • 6:41-7:54 Grouping

    7:55-13:44 M.1-7 Repeated notes

    • 7:55-9:06 Repeated notes in general
    • 9:07-10:17 Staccato playing in repeated notes
    • 10:18-10:47 Rotation
    • 10:48-12:42 In and out motion & Forearm shift with rotation & Shaping
    • 12:43-end How much one has to come up
  • Double Thirds

    0:00-4:25 Beethoven 5th concerto 1mov. M.187 Double thirds

    • 0:30-1:45 Fingering double thirds
    • 1:46-3:09 Walking hand and arm is always there
    • 3:10-4:25 Shaping

    Debussy La Puerta del Vino- Double thirds 4:26-end

    • 4:26-6:24 M.71
    • 6:25-8:51 M. 73
  • Chopin Nocturne Op.48-1 M.49-52 & M. 69-70

    0:00-15:10 mm.49-52

    • 1:00-1:30 Why are the shoulders holding up?
    • 1:30-6:16 Repeated chords and voicing the chords
    • 6:17- 9:18 Does one have to hang on the long note?
    • 9:19-12:46 Left hand: double notes trills and leaps
    • 12:47-15:10 How to express syncopation?

    15:10-end mm. 69-70

    • 15:10-18:23 Left hand leaps and redistribution
    • 18:24-18:49 Right hand – how to play the chords? It’s all physically staccato
    • 18:50-end Right hand – in and out motion
  • Chopin Scherzo No. 2 mm.545-582
    • 1:45-6:19 Staccato Leaps in both hands from M.552.
    • 6:20-7:20 Cause of tension: twist / how to solve this?
    • 7:20-8:45 playing octaves with 1-5 and getting legato effect.
    • 8:46-9:17 torso adjustment
    • 9:18 –10:33 leaps in both directions and how to organize it. (active direction and passive direction)
    • 10:34-end Leaps with both hands simultaneously: which hand goes first?
  • How to handle leaps

    Beethoven Sonata Op.2 No.3 1st Movement

    • 0:00-1:38: The wrist: where should it be and what’s it’s role?
    • 1:38-3:04: Leaps in broken chords; applying single rotation and the walking hand and arm
    • 3:04-4:45: using redistribution to simplify the passage
  • Edna Golandsky discusses Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 8
    • 0:05-0:47: Trill: measuring number of notes and in&out
    • 0:47-3:24: part scale/part arpeggio
    • 3:25-4:20: exception in shaping when thumb crosses under
    • 4:20-6:27: one black key changes the in and out + to avoid stretching of the thumb
    • 6:41-8:05: using rotation and grouping to cover distances and changes of direction
    • 8:08-9:48: arpeggio: crossing over thumb in the black key area and fingering
  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 6 and Op. 25 No. 1: Double Thirds
    • 0:00-2:12: double rotation and settling the arm equally behind each note
    • 2:12-3:38: in and out and fingering in the trill
    • 3:38-4:34: fingering, crossing and shaping in moving double thirds
    • 4:35-5:45: ascending chromatic double third scale
    • 5:55-6:47: opening of Chopin op 10 no 8 completely minimized
    • 6:53-13:23: Chopin op 25 no 1: Edna showing a few different places covering playing on black keys, rotation, in and out, shaping, leaps and grouping
  • Edna Golandsky decodes Chopin Op. 10 No. 1 (Skype lecture)
    • 0:00 – 1:25: General introduction
    • 1:25 – 3:45: Redistribution, positioning the torso
    • 3:45 – 5:30: Analysis of the rotation
    • 5:30 – 7:38: Analysis of the In & Out
    • 7:38 – 10:20: Analysis of the shaping and the combination of movements
    • 10:20 – 13:50: Grouping and other considerations
    • 13:50 – 25:55: Fingering, and other considerations (In & Out, rotation, walking hand and arm, grouping)
    • 24:55 – 25:37: Final thoughts
  • Measuring the In and Out in Mozart Sonata K. 333
    • 1:36 – 10:28 Measures 1-4.
    • 10:29 – 11:40 Playing the B-flat Major scale.
    • 11:41 – 12:15 Measure 6.
    • 14:44 – 19:12 End of measure 11. Coming out as a unit from a short finger on a black key to a longer finger on a white key.
    • 19:45 – 22:28 Measure 12. Combining Shaping and In and Out on single rotations.
    • 26:29 – 29:52 Measure 18 and 20.
    • 30:11 – 32:25 Measure 60
  • Playing Slow Passages Brahms Op 117 no 1 + Bonus Rachmaninoff Example
    • 00:34 – 7:38 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1. Making a legato effect through tone production and Shaping (enslavement to notation).
    • 7:39 – 8:54 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1, measure 7. How motion affects the musical result (tone production, shaping).
    • 8:55 – 12:20 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1, measure 21, Right Hand. Leaps, playing from a single note to an interval, grouping.
    • 12:21 – 14:50 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1, measure 21, Left Hand. Leaps, soft playing.
    • 15:19 – 19:21 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1, measure 38. Making a melody that is divided between the hands sound like one melody.
    • 19:23 – 22:02 Brahms Op. 117 no. 1, measure 38. Interdependence of the Hands, cueing.
    • 22:03 – 23:55 Rachmaninoff Op. 32 no. 10. Fast motion during slow playing
  • Chopin Op 25 No. 5
    • 0:21 – 3:25 Rotating from single notes to intervals in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section).
    • 3:36 – 5:51 In and Out motion in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section).
    • 5:52 – 7:10 Shaping in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section).
    • 7:11 – 8:09 Thinking the Closest Note in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section).
    • 8:12 – 9:32 Grouping in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section).
    • 9:34 – 13:33 Rhythmic Expression in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5 (Middle section)
  • Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 2: Avoiding Twisting through Proper Rotation and Shaping in the opening

    Length: 6’44”

    Chopin’s etude Op. 10 no.2 is known for its the use of the notorious “weak” outer fingers. Edna explains how to feel grounded in the keys and prevent any twisting of the alignment through single and double rotations.

    • 00:00 – 4:24 Eliminating Twisting and Applying Single and Double Rotation in Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 2.
    • 4:25 – 5:52 Grouping and Shaping in Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 2
    • 5:53 – 6:45 Left hand Leaps in Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 2
  • Playing more Efficiently in excerpts from Debussy’s Jardins Sous La Pluie

    Length: 14’22”

    Debussy’s Jardins Sous La Pluie is piece of music filled with many technical barriers that can be understood through proper Taubman movements and concepts. Edna goes through various excerpts from this work and shows how one can alleviate the difficulties on the page.

    • 0:00 – 3:40 Redistribution
    • 3:40 – 5:40 Repeating notes/Leaps
    • 5:40 – 6:50 Understanding notation
    • 6:50 – 8:06 Redistribution
    • 8:06 – 10:51 Leaps
    • 10:51 – 12:13 Torso Movement
    • 12:13 – 13:18 Redistribution
    • 13:18 – 14:22 Addendum
  • Chopin Ballade No. 2: Examining and Solving difficult passages

    Length: 16’24”

    Many people bring the Presto con fuoco section from the 2nd Ballade with questions on how to play with more ease. Edna looks at various passages and explains the multiple aspects that go into moving more naturally and efficiently.

    • 0:00 – 1:30 Rotating to the left for RH intervals
    • 1:30 – 3:47 Moving Out in white keys
    • 3:47 – 6:20 Shaping to ease movement
    • 6:20 – 8:00 Torso Mvmt/Grouping
    • 8:00 – 8:30 Moving into the Black Keys
    • 8:30 – 11:20 Rotating to the left for RH
    • 11:20 – 12:05 In and Out/Grouping in 2
    • 12:05 – 12:52 Efficient Leaps
    • 12:52 – 13:50 Single and Double Rotations
    • 14:10 – 16:24 Octaves/LH
  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No.6 Using Rotation and In and out for double thirds

    Length: 6’30”

    Many people come with problems in playing double thirds and especially with issues from Op.25 No.6. Edna addresses the common misconceptions in rotating for double thirds and how to move in and out of the keys to assist this issue.

  • Chopin Etude Op. 10 No.9 Avoiding stretching in the LH

    Length: 2’29”

    The LH of Op.10 No.9 can be injurious if done incorrectly with stretching of big intervals. Edna suggests a fingering and shows how to move in the keys in order to rotate efficiently in these LH figurations.

  • Chopin Etude, Op. 25 no 10 (from the Brisbane weekend workshop, Jan 2015)

  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 3: Leaping with freedom

    Length: 4’28”

    Although it is a lesser played work of the Op.25 set, this etude contains issues involving proper leaps and use of shaping to assist this. Edna goes through these movement in both hands and suggests some fingerings.

  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 5: Choreography and Grouping

    Length: 10’12”

    Many times, pianists will resort to the same fingerings for passages that visibly look the same on the page. This can produce very tense hand positions; Edna works on better fingerings and ways to shape these passages so that they are easier to play.

  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 11

    Length: 8’31”

    • 0:00 – 3:25 Rotation/Fingering
    • 3:25 – 7:10 Arpeggios/Connecting
    • 7:10 – 8:30 Going up/Small leap

    Op.25 No.11 presents many challenges for the movement of the right hand. Edna briefly shows what concepts she applies for the playing of these figurations from the opening.

  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 12: Moving efficiently in the arpeggiated figures

    Length: 9’13”

    The figuration in the opening of this etude, as well as in the rest of the work, can be facilitated with the right knowledge of rotation and subtle over-shaping. Edna demonstrates these concepts as well as including the importance of moving the torso to keep the forearm aligned with the hand.

  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No. 2: Avoiding injury from Twisting and Stretching with the LH

    Length: 4’35”

    The LH of the Op.25 No. 2 can be a hazard if approached physically incorrectly. Edna goes through an excerpt explaining how one can prevent twisting by becoming comfortable with the black key area and letting go by using a staccato touch.

  • RH arpeggios in Beethoven Sonata Op. 27 no 2, 3rd movt

    Length: 11’55”

    Some pianists have claimed that this passage is so tiring that it leaves one fatigued just by playing it. Edna talks about how to prevent this through concepts such as torso movement and shows how moving in the black keys will assist by preventing twisting.

  • Granados’ Epílogo, de Las Escenas Románticas: Moving with ease in the LH arpeggios

    Length: 7’55”

    In appreciation of the beautiful melody of Granados, we may forget that the LH arpeggios should receive attention so that they are played with control of efficient choreography. Edna discusses utilizing In and Out so that one becomes comfortable rotating into each note.

  • Mendelssohn Étude in B-flat minor, Op. 104 No. 2: Playing RH Arpeggios with ease

    Length: 15’30”

    Pianists of all backgrounds and skill levels come with questions about how to play arpeggios with comfort. Edna uses this etude to show how the marriage of rotation and in and out will assist in playing arpeggios. She also touches on the subtleties of shaping and its ability to “smooth” out ones rotations in playing.

  • Double Thirds: Part 1 of 3

    Length: 10’38”

    Double thirds are challenging for many, but with an understanding of what goes behind the technique, one can play with much more ease. Edna goes through double thirds going up and down the keyboard and finishes with an excerpt from the E flat Major Sonata.

    • 0:00 – 3:30 Rotating to the left
    • 3:30 – 4:48 Crossing over
    • 4:48 – 6:10 In and out
    • 6:10 – 8:00 Going up
    • 8:00 – 9:12 In/Out and shaping
    • 9:12 – 10:38 Haydn E flat Major Sonata
  • Single rotations in Chopin Etudes: “Winter Wind” and the “Black Key” etudes.

    Length: 5’18”

    In these well-known etudes, the use of proper single rotations will allow one to play more efficiently than any isolated movements. Edna demonstrates this and applies the same concept to both etudes.

    • 00:00 – 3:19 Single Rotation, shaping and Torso adjustment in Chopin Etude Op. 25 No.11
    • 3:20 – 5:18 Single Rotation, In and Out and shaping in Chopin Etude Op. 10 No. 5
  • Chopin Etude Op. 25 No.11: Using the Proper Choreography to play the Arpeggios

    Length:6’39”

    Edna displays the multiple aspects that goes into playing these arpeggios and demonstrates the proper rotations, in/out movements, and more. She also briefly addresses the small leap at the end of this passage.

    • 00:00 – 2:07 Rotation (1st line of arpeggios).
    • 2:08 – 4:22 In and Out and Shaping (1st line of arpeggios).
    • 4:23 – 6:40 Rotation, In and Out, Shaping and Leaps (2nd line of arpeggios)
  • Chopin’s Etude Op. 10 No. 8: Rotating with the proper In and Out

    Length: 4’00”

    Edna takes a look at the opening of the Op. 10 No. 8 etude and demonstrated how moving in and out with the right finger will facilitate the arpeggios. The proper single and double rotations will make this passage much more natural when ultimately minimized.

  • Using the Taubman Method to play arpeggios comfortably

    Length: 11:10

    Arpeggios are one of the fundamental aspects of technique in piano playing as they are constantly seen in classical literature. Edna uncovers the way one can play arpeggios with confidence and offers an example from an excerpt from Op. 31 No. 2

    • 0:00 – 4:00 Rotation
    • 4:00 – 4:50 Minimizing
    • 4:50 – 5:35 Moving In/Out
    • 5:35 – 7:05 Shaping
    • 7:05 – 11:10 Beethoven’s Op.31 No. 2
  • Rotation, playing Scales with the Taubman Approach and the process of minimizing

    Length: 14’24”

    One of the first things a pianist learns when adopting the Taubman method is how to play scales naturally. Edna goes through the multiple aspects of playing the C Major scale using Mozart’s K.545.

    • 0:00 – 3:00 Rotating as a unit
    • 3:00 – 6:00 Mozart’s K.545
    • 6:00 – 9:00 Shaping
    • 9:00 – 12:00 Minimizing
    • 12:00 – 13:55 Rotation in slower passage
    • 13:55 – 14:24 Demonstration
  • Schumann piano concerto: Physical legato versus musical legato (Part 2)

    Length: 2’20”

    • One hand triggers the other hand
    • How to leap securely
  • Schumann piano concerto: Physical legato versus musical legato (Part 1)

    Length: 3’21”

  • LH shaping in Chopin’s C# minor Nocturne

    Edna Golandsky shows the difference in sound when applying shaping to ones playing compared to one without.

  • RH shaping in Chopin’s C# minor Nocturne

    Length: 4’01”

    Edna Golandsky displays shaping in RH melodic material while giving examples of breaking one’s alignment through use of an excessively high or low wrist.

  • Expressive playing in slower moving passages: Chopin’s C# minor Nocturne

    Edna Golandsky plays a short excerpt from Chopin’s C# minor Nocturne to demonstrate how one properly moves in a slower moving passage.

  • Efficient movements in the opening of Beethoven’s Pathetique Sonata

    Length: 11’40”

    Edna explains the most efficient movements to play the opening of the Pathetique sonata with a singing quality through proper shaping as well as making sure not to stay in the keys longer than necessary.

  • Expressive playing in slow passages: Beethoven’s Pathetique Sonata

    Length: 1’17”

    Edna plays a short excerpt from the opening of the Pathetique sonata to demonstrate how one moves during a slower passage.

  • Playing comfortable broken octaves while avoiding fatigue: Beethoven’s Pathetique Sonata

    Length: 4’54”

    Incorrect broken octaves can lead to fatigue and injury through isolation of the fingers. Edna explains how one can play without stretching and isolating through synchronized movements using an excerpt from the Pathetique sonata.

  • Staccato playing with shaping and phrasing in Beethoven’s Spring Sonata for violin and piano

    Length: 3’01”

    How short should staccato playing be? Edna demonstrates how to play and shape shorter notes without interrupting the musical line.

  • Playing quick repeated notes with ease in Ravel’s Alborada del Gracioso

    Length: 0’57”

    Edna briefly applies rotation and shaping in repeated notes using the famous passage from Alborada del Gracioso

  • Playing quick repeated notes efficiently in Scarlatti’s Sonata in D minor

    Length: 4’10”

    Edna demonstrates playing repeated notes with rotation and moving to other keys with single rotation. She also discusses how to play the broken chords in the LH in synchrony with the RH.

  • Moving In and Out to play repeated notes in Scarlatti’s D minor Sonata

    Length: 3’15”

    Moving in and out correctly allows one to play repeated notes with a greater ease. Edna demonstrates this along with using single and double rotations in Scarlatti’s D minor Sonata.

  • Common issues and questions in the opening of Beethoven’s Waldstein Sonata

    Length: 13’47”

    Edna goes through various aspects of playing with the most natural movements in the opening of the Waldstein Sonata. These topics include leaps, shaping, torso movement, in/out and more.

    • 0:00 – 0:13 Demonstration
    • 0:13 – 3:24 Shaping
    • 3:24 – 5:38 Leaps
    • 5:38 – 6:34 Torso movement
    • 6:34 – 8:00 Soft Playing
    • 8:00 – 9:20 Shaping
    • 9:20 – 10:44 Rotation in trill-like figuration
    • 10:44 – 12:29 Leaps/Rotation
    • 12:29 – 13:47 Twisting In/Out